Update

5/05/12

Photo: Aitor Ortiz



A residential block of 242 new social housing dwellings by ACXT Architects has been completed in Salburúa, not far from Madrid.

The building comprises a 21-storey tower and a continuous u-shaped block with a varying height of between four and seven floors. Additionally there are nine retail units and two underground levels of parking.

The dwellings are double fronted, the bedrooms being on the façade that looks over the garden patio, whilst the kitchen and living areas face the street. Thus, the public area of the house is linked with its urban equivalent, and the more private one destined for rest, is linked with the inner courtyard as a space of peace and quiet.

Given the view from the rest of the towers of the roof of the lowest block of the building, an important effort was made to treat its appearance with care, considering it, without a doubt, as the building’s fifth façade. For that purpose, all buildings services are grouped around the central axis of the building and are ventilated through a continuous ventilation grille, thus avoiding the presence of rooftop typical chimneys.


Ph: Aitor Ortiz

Ph: Aitor Ortiz

Ph: Aitor Ortiz

Typical plan

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3 Trackbacks For This Post

  1. The Sniffer, June 15th, 2012: Trends in News and Architecture | The Sniffer Says:

    [...] Cathi Bond brings us a cool project in more sustainable architecture. It’s a social housing project near Madrid. Cathi likes it because it’s designed with ‘flow through’ in mind, and because it uses “cogeneration” as a power source, which allows the waste heat generated to be used for things like heating water (via Architecture Today). [...]

  2. The Sniffer, June 15th, 2012: Trends in News and Architecture | Cathi Bond Says:

    [...] Meanwhile, I’ve dug up what I think is a fairly a cool project in more sustainable architecture. It’s a social housing project near Madrid. I like it because it’s designed with ‘flow through’ in mind, and because it uses “cogeneration” as a power source, which allows the waste heat generated to be used for things like heating water (viaArchitecture Today). [...]

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    [...] Read More here: architecturetoday.co.uk/?p=23004 [...]…